Friday, December 07, 2018

Judge Elisha M. Colver



In Judge Colver’s obituary in the Sandusky Register of September 25, 1895, the headline read “Death of a Patriot, Soldier, Jurist and Orator.”  Elisha M. Colver was born in Hudson, New York in 1832, but received his early education in Monroeville, Ohio. He graduated from the Cincinnati Law School in 1859, with the highest honors of his class. After leaving college, he moved to Perrysburg, Ohio. While in Perrysburg, he enlisted in the Third Ohio Cavalry, first serving as first lieutenant of Company B; later he was promoted to Captain. 

In 1864, Elisha M. Colver came to Sandusky, Ohio to aid in the recruiting of a cavalry regiment. Having concluded his military service, he opened up a law office in Sandusky. He was elected as Sandusky’s City Solicitor in 1868, and served as Probate Judge of Erie County from 1869 through 1878. Judge Colver's first wife was Clara Prout. After her death, he married Miss Caroline T. Wood. 

Judge Colver was a charter member of the McMeens Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, and was very active in local Masonic organizations as well. He was known to be an excellent speaker, with his speaking services in great demand, and “his energy would put to shame many a younger man. He was in every sense of the word an American citizen and his enthusiasm in the support of American institutions was unbounded.”  Judge Colver had delivered the eulogy for John Brown, Jr. at Put in Bay, just a few months before his own death. Judge Colver was buried in Oakland Cemetery in the family plot. 

To learn more about Judge Elisha M. Colver, see Elected to Serve, by Patty Pascoe at the Archives Research Center of the Sandusky Library. Also, a lengthy tribute to Judge Colver appeared in the September 27, 1895 issue of the Sandusky Register.


The Sandusky Library Archives Research Center has in its collections a scrapbook containing letters and telegrams of condolence sent to the family of Judge Colver following his death. The telegram below was sent by Judge Malcolm Kelley.



Tuesday, December 04, 2018

Art Works by George Koch



Above is a painting by George Koch, which is on display in the Children’s Services area of the Sandusky Library. It depicts children building a snowman in the 1940s. 

George William Albert Koch was born in Germany in 1878. At the age of 14 he emigrated to the U.S. He graduated from the Pratt Institute in New York, and for several years he was a freelance artist in Connecticut. In 1921 George Koch moved to Sandusky, where he worked as the Art Director for the American Crayon Company. An article in the July 8, 1938 issue of the Sandusky Star Journal stated that Mr. Koch was “a brilliant colorist who is responsible for the many developments in the color line and head of the art department.”  Mr. Koch was a participant in many local art shows, and he often served as a judge in art shows. He took both first and second place in an exhibition of the Sandusky Camera Club in December of 1939, and in November of 1946, he took third place in an art show for his painting “Lengthening Shadows.” 

George W.A. Koch died on March 2, 1947. He was survived by his wife Maude, a sister, niece and nephew. Below are illustrations he made for promotional materials for the American Crayon Company.

 

Saturday, December 01, 2018

Historic Views of the Southwest Corner of Monroe and Hancock Streets


    
When M.J. Bender opened a grocery store at the southwest corner of Monroe and Hancock Streets in Sandusky on February 18, 1891, a newspaper ad stated that it was “one of the finest and largest grocery stores in Sandusky.” Bender’s carried a full line of fancy and staple groceries, flour, and feed. The store was located on the site of Ohly’s old stand. By 1908 Mr. Bender moved his store to the corner of Hancock and Water Streets. For a brief time, sometime between 1910 and 1920, Wendt’s grocery was at that location.

   
In the 1920s and 1930s, the Lazarra and Maschari families ran a fruit market on this site. From at least 1940 through 1960, Otto’s Ice Cream was in business at 701 Hancock Street. This advertisement appeared in the Sandusky Register Star News on January 25, 1946.

         
By 1990 a flooring business was in operation at 701 Hancock Street. 
        


Many different businesses have been in operation at this busy Sandusky intersection. Some years, no business was at this location. To learn more about any specific location in Sandusky, visit the Sandusky Library to view historic Sandusky city directories. The street listings are helpful in determining what businesses were at what address at a given time.

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Pictures from a Play by the Harlequins in 1948


On November 15 and 16, 1948, the local dramatic group the Harlequins presented the play You Can’t Take it With You. The play was a comedy written by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. Some of the individuals in the picture above are: Carl Miller, Fran Miller, Eldon Rosswurm, Carroll Post, Lois Meyer, Shirley Carpenter, June Palmer, Ralph Hoffhines, Dorothy Lalond and Jack Mayer. The play was about the fun-loving Sycamore family. In the local production featured June Palmer as Alice Sycamore and Ralph Hoffhines as Tony Kirby. Below is another scene from the play.


Carroll Post and Orson Kniseley built a model boat for the play.

An article in the November 16, 1948 issue of the Sandusky Register Star News reported that “good performances were given by all.” Jack Mayer stole the show as a Russian ballet master, sporting an eagle tattoo and a Russian accent. Someone in the cast created a holiday greeting card with a picture of the set from the play.

These photographs were donated to the Sandusky Library Archives Research Center from the Kniseley family. Orson Kniseley played Grandpa Vanderhoff in the local play.

Saturday, November 24, 2018

Isaac D. Everett, Sandusky Merchant


Isaac D. Everett was born in 1830 to Adam and Mary (Wolverton) Everett. In 1862, he married Lavinia Nettleton, who was fondly known as Fanny. He was the brother in law of Leonard B. Johnson, the owner of Johnson’s Island at the time. 

In the 1867 Sandusky City Directory, Mr. Everett was in a partnership with Andrew Zerbe and E. and F. Nicolai in a dry goods business on Water Street between Columbus Avenue and Jackson Street.


By 1876, Isaac and his son had their own store on Columbus Avenue. They sold china, glass and queensware, which was a cream-colored earthenware.


An advertisement which appeared in the April 16, 1890 issue of the Sandusky Register announced the opening of a new store, run by Isaac D. Everett and his son Lu. The store sold groceries, fruits, and candies, and was located at 234 Columbus Avenue.


On the day of the grand opening, the Everetts provided coffee and a light lunch to all who stopped in. The ad stated that “We do not care whether you spend any money or not.” In 1892, I.D. Everett and Son moved to 226 Columbus Avenue. By the time of the 1900 U.S. Census, I.D. Everett had retired, and he was living with his daughter Nellie Nason in Columbus, Ohio. Mr. I.D. Everett passed away on October 30, 1907 at the home of his daughter Mrs. Nason, who by then had moved to Chicago, Illinois. Burial was in the family lot at Sandusky’s Oakland Cemetery

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Happy Thanksgiving

(Reposted from 2006)

As many of you might remember learning in grade school, the first "official" Thanksgiving was proclaimed by President Abraham Lincoln during the height of the Civil War, in 1863, in honor of the first Thanksgiving held by the pilgrims in Plymouth during the 17th century. But even before President Lincoln made Thanksgiving a holiday, it was traditionally celebrated by many people. The first letter below is evidence of that:

In this letter, Judge Samuel Caldwell of Sandusky has invited Samuel Butler and his wife Clara to his home for Thanksgiving dinner. (We know pumpkin pie was on the menu!) The date of the letter is November 23, 1846, nearly twenty years before the national holiday was observed. (It is also interesting to note that even then Thanksgiving was celebrated on a Thursday in November -- nobody seems to know for sure why this day was chosen.)

The second letter is from Eliza Follett, the wife of Oran Follett, requesting contributions from local residents to provide Thanksgiving food to the wives and children of soldiers serving in the Civil War. Mrs. Follett was very active in community service and charitable work, as can be inferred from this letter.

Have a happy Thanksgiving. . .

Sunday, November 18, 2018

Sandusky Taxicab Advertisements in 1919



Arthur L. Pietschman ran the Pietschman Transfer & Taxi Company in Sandusky in 1919. He offered taxi service during the night or day, and also moved baggage, theatrical items and pianos. In 1923 he changed the name of his business to Pietschman’s Yellow Cab. 

The Cadillac Transfer and Taxi Company was operated by Oscar G. Biehl and Harry J. Andres.


The Cadillac Transfer and Taxi Company offered rides day or night, with a “big, roomy limousine or touring car.”  The advertisement below indicates that the Cadillac Taxi provided speed with safety, and the owners suggested customers call for an appointment for the best service.


E.H. Schlessman, best remembered as a commercial photographer in Sandusky for several years, ran the Buick Taxi Company. This advertisement from the December 31, 1919 issue of the Sandusky Register, states that the Buick Taxi Company offered “high class” cars that were clean and equipped with heaters.


Thursday, November 15, 2018

The Central Avenue Fire Station


In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a fire station stood at the northeast corner of Central Avenue and Osborne Streets. Known as Fire Station Number 4, it was constructed of limestone, with a tower and an arched doorway that allowed room for the entry of horse drawn vehicles. Below is a portion of the 1905 Sanborn map which shows the layout of the fire station.


This close up view shows several fire fighters at the Number 4 station.

     
In 1908, Captain Adam E. Hartung died after he was thrown from a horse cart, while on a fire call. The station and fire vehicle were decorated in memory of Captain Hartung prior to the funeral procession.

       
The former fire station at the corner of Central Avenue and Osborne Streets was razed about 1930.

Sunday, November 11, 2018

Honoring Those Who Served in World War I


As we commemorate the 100th anniversary of World War I, it is time to take a moment to remember the soldiers from Erie County who gave their lives for their country during the war.

Harold Blancke


Harold Blancke was born on January 10th, 1900 in Perkins Township. He enlisted long before the United States entered the war. He enlisted in the 6th Ohio, a National Guard unit, on July 7th, 1915. Once the war started the 6th Ohio was stationed around the state guarding railroad bridges and railroad yards. Harold was stationed outside of Port Clinton guarding the New York Central Bridge. On the night of April 15th, when Harold was relieving another soldier of guard duty, Harold was struck by a train and killed instantly. He was buried in Oakland Cemetery Sandusky, Ohio on April 17th. Harold Blancke was the first soldier from Erie County to die during World War I.

Elmer Reese

Elmer Reese was born in Niles, Ohio on August 12th, 1896. He eventually moved to Sandusky to work for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. He enlisted in the Marines on May 19th, 1917 and was assigned to the 6th Regiment, Company A. He was promoted to Corporal on November 30th, 1917. He was shipped to Europe with his units on February 20th, 1918. During the Battle of Belleau Wood Elmer was killed in action on June 8th, 1918. He became the first Erie County soldier killed in combat during the war. His family was notified of the death on September 20th, 1918. Corporal Reese was originally buried in France but in 1921 his body was returned to the United States to buried. His body arrived in Sandusky on September 12th, 1921 with funeral services and burial in Oakland Cemetery Sandusky, Ohio the next day.

John Risch


John Risch was born in Sandusky, Ohio on October 31st, 1891.  John enlisted in the Coastal Artillery on November 21st, 1913 long before the war even started. He was stationed at several forts on the west coast, but mainly in Washington state. On June 11th, 1918 he was discharged with a 100% disability due to an illness. After discharged he returned to Sandusky. In January of 1919 he was admitted to the Sandusky Soldiers' Home and was discharged on March 1919. John was the first soldier to be admitted to the Sandusky Soldiers' Home who served in World War I. He died May 12th, 1919 and was buried in Oakland Cemetery Sandusky, Ohio.

Edward Roth


Edward Roth was born in Sandusky, Ohio on May 24th, 1893. He enlisted in the regular army on October 5th, 1917. He was sent to Camp Sheridan in Alabama and stayed there until his discharge on June 19th, 1918. Edward was discharged with 100% disability due to a chronic illness. After discharge Edward returned to Sandusky and eventually died in Good Samaritan Hospital on June 24th, 1919. This marks the last soldier to die from Erie County whose cause of death was linked to his time in the service during the war. Edward’s funeral was June 27th, 1919 and was buried in Oakland Cemetery Sandusky, Ohio.

In total 56 soldiers died in the service of the country during the war from Erie County. Twenty-three soldiers died due to combat related injuries. The rest either died from illness (26), accident (3), or cause of death is unknown (4). Exactly half of these soldiers died during the month of October in 1918. There is no better way to honor these men than to remember them. Below is a list of the soldiers who died during their service.

First Name
Last Name
Date of Death
Cause of Death
Harold E.
Blancke
4/14/1917
Killed by Train
John
Knupke
5/31/1917
Scarlet Fever
Harry J.
Colvin
1/21/1918
Pneumonia
Elmer A.
Reese
6/8/1918
KIA
Lowell C.
Hein
7/20/1918
KIA
Millard M.
Moore
7/28/1918
KIA
Charles W.
Scott
7/29/1918
Died of Wounds
Charles A.
McCormick
8/11/1918
Illness
Joe
Horvath
8/14/1918
Died of Wounds
John
Leaver
8/14/1918
Died of Wounds
Herbert Le Roy
Stanton
8/16/1918
Unknown
Rufus R. D.
Smith
8/30/1918
Illness
Thomas C.
Curtis
8/31/1918
Died of Wounds
Charles J.
Reilly
9/6/1918
KIA
J. Ralph
Cookson
9/18/1918
KIA
Archie
Birch (Burch)
9/29/1918
Unknown
Archie F.
Burch
9/29/1918
KIA
Anthony
Dantonio
9/29/1918
KIA
Fred
Ritz
10/3/1918
Pneumonia
Lee P.
Magill
10/4/1918
Bronchopneumonia
James H.
White
10/4/1918
KIA
Nelson C.
Geise
10/5/1918
Pneumonia
James H. (Hall)
Friday
10/6/1918
Influenza
Walter T. (Walter Theodore)
Hall
10/6/1918
Labor Pneumonia
Russell E.
Miller
10/6/1918
KIA
Edward O.
Miller
10/6/1918
Typhoid Fever
Morris J.
Platte
10/9/1918
Spanish Flu
Carl A.
Salzman
10/9/1918
Bronchopneumonia
George H.
Feiszli
10/10/1918
Died of Wounds
Ralph B.
Quackenboss
10/10/1918
Pneumonia
Chester P. (J)
Herb
10/11/1918
Pneumonia
Joseph
Orcutt
10/11/1918
KIA
Clarence A.
Popke
10/11/1918
Tetanus
Ralph T.
Saunders
10/11/1918
Unknown
Joseph F.
Baier
10/12/1918
Pneumonia
Clarence P.
Howard
10/12/1918
Accident Overseas
August W.
Meyer
10/12/1918
Influenza
John
Sattler
10/13/1918
Influenza
Joseph
Dewhirst
10/14/1918
Pneumonia
Fred
Dale
10/18/1918
pneumonia
Lester C. (Lester Conrad)
Kautz
10/20/1918
Labor Pneumonia
Carl A.
Link
10/21/1918
KIA
Max
Schnittker
10/21/1918
KIA
August H.
Speer
10/23/1918
KIA
Robert
Adkerson
10/27/1918
Unknown
Austin J.
Atwood
10/31/1918
Accidental Drowning
Carl F.
Fedderson
11/4/1918
KIA
John A.
Michel
11/8/1918
KIA
Emil
Strickler
11/11/1918
Died of Wounds
Albert F.
Schlett
11/21/1918
Influenza
George A.
Scheid
12/10/1918
Unknown
Charles H.
Parker
12/20/1918
Pneumonia
Gaius (Gains)
McDowell
1/19/1919
Flu
Ernest H.
Wankey
3/2/1919
Died of Wounds
John A.
Risch
5/12/1919
Illness
Edward Frank (F.)
Roth
6/24/1919
Illness