Wednesday, April 02, 2014

A Series of Photographs from Good Samaritan Hospital in the 1920s


Now a part of the Firelands Regional Medical Center, the Good Samaritan Hospital dates back to 1876 when the cornerstone was laid for the original facility.  The first Good Samaritan Hospital opened in 1886, but closed in 1893 due to financial problems. Pictured above is the Good Samaritan Hospital shortly after it was rebuilt in 1918-1919. The front of the hospital faced Van Buren Street. The nursing staff is pictured below in 1923.


 Members of the hospital’s office staff can be seen in this picture, taken in January 1923. Two typewriters and an early public address system were used by the employees.

   
The babies’ ward was relatively small in the 1920s.


 This Standard Electric stove was cutting edge for its day.



Here is a hospital examination room from 1923.


The ward system was used in the 1920s, with separate wards for men, women and children.



Visit the Sandusky Library Archives Research Center to read more about the history of medicine in our community. Historical articles about Sandusky's hospitals and doctors are found in Hewson Peeke’s A Standard History of Erie County, and in the Twin Anniversary Edition of the Sandusky Register Star News, published on November 21, 1947, now on microfilm.

2 comments:

JudyNV said...

Was it expensive and unusual for local girls to go to Columbus to learn to be a nurse? How long did it take to become a registered nurse? Did they have to quit when they got married (like female teachers did)? I think that my great aunt, Lucie Bock Engles was the director of nursing at Good Samaritan after 1910. I suppose she was a nurse there also in the earlier days but I don't have any proof. I really love your blog!!

Sandusky Library Archives Research Center said...

Sorry, those questions are beyond our knowledge. This article on nursing, from the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History, might help a little.
http://ech.case.edu/cgi/article.pl?id=N5